Shattering Myths About Teachers

In my life I always come across people who have to put their two cents in when I tell them I am a teacher. I often get comments like, “those summers off will be really nice” or “working until 3:30 everyday is going to be a walk in the park” or my favorite “those who can’t teach”… In my experiences so far this year, I can’t even begin to explain how those myths about teachers and teaching are wrong. Don’t get me wrong, I love having a summer break to look forward to; however, the amount that goes in behind the scenes is the undocumented element that make teachers the worlds true super heroes.

In this post, I am going to uncover some of the myths behind teaching in an attempt to shed some light on the crazy, amazing profession I am apart of. And for those of you who are reading this who aren’t teachers, perhaps you will gain some empathy for the battle ground we face every day.

myth

Myth #1: working until 3:30 everyday is going to be a walk in the park…

LOL. In the 5 and a half months that I have been a teacher I don’t think I have left school at 3:30 once and I guarantee most teachers will agree.

The 7 and a half hours that I see my students is ‘on time’ of this profession. The time where I am persuading, presenting, teaching, creating, inspiring for 7 and a half our of the day. That time does not count the time I am preparing for what is going to happen in the 7 and a half hours every day, organizing extra curricular events and activities, meeting with parents, marking, emailing, creating report cards… all of that happens on my own time.

Now don’t get me wrong, I WANT to put in that time because of the benefit it has in my day and in my opinion is required.

Myth #2: those who can’t teach…

Most likely the most offensive of them all, but most likely the most wrong of them all. Here is the thing about being a teacher, being a teacher matters 100% of the time everyday. I am making impacting decisions that may change my students’ lives every minute, every day. The people I work with choose to make those impacting decisions with me every day. At times, I have to make split second decisions and live with what ever actions are going to come after that, and most of the time I don’t even have time to weigh those odds.

There are so many facets of being a teacher; teaching the lessons, marking assignments and tests, writing report cards… that’s the easy part. It’s the part about how you have 120 different humans in your classroom every day with different challenges and struggles, with different successes and triumphs that is the hard part.

Being a teacher matters 100% of the time. Being a teacher, requires an extra-ordinary kind of person.

Myth #3: If you went to school, you know what teaching is…

I often get people trying to give me tips about being a teacher. Although I love hearing feedback and am very open to how I can improve as a professional, it is difficult to hear the constant comments about “how this one teacher in high school used PowerPoint so I should too”, or “do you do any cool activities with your students because the best teacher would do this”.

The reality is, I am constantly and consistently innovating and changing, trying new things, old things and the unimaginable with my students. My university education, life experience, and learn from it moments along the way… are helping me be the best I can.

The reality is, if you went to school you don’t know how to be a teacher.

Myth #4: It’s your job, you get paid for it…

As a first year teacher, with 4 years on university the reality of making a $100,000 salary is not in my near future. The extra overtime and the bonuses for doing good work don’t exist in the profession I chose.

The reality, teachers I know have second jobs to support themselves and their families.

The reality, we may not be paid in  dollars, but we are paid in the difference we make every day, the smiles and laughs the students share in my classroom, and the appreciation for being a person that my students will remember forever; in this sense, myth is correct in that I get paid for it.

I could continue with the realities of the profession I love and admire so much. I wouldn’t change it for the world and I hope by reading these realities people begin the appreciate the work that happens behind the scenes.

 

Cheers,

Miss Rylance 

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